Handwriting

We teach children a cursive handwriting script (pictured above) where every letter starts from the line. Whilst we recognise that all children progress at different rates (and from different starting points) our broad aims for handwriting are:

By the end of Reception Year - children should be forming all pre-cursive letters correctly

By the end of Year 2 - children should be joining their writing in a cursive script

By the beginning of Year 4 - children should be writing in pen

This page contains a number of resources for families to download and use to practice handwriting with their child. If you have any questions about this, please speak with your child's class teacher.

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Capital & Lower Case Letter Card

A card showing each of the cursive, lower case letters alongside a capital letter. Useful for helping children to tell the two apart.

A to Z Solid and Dotted Letters

Two pages. The first shows the lower case, cursive letters. The second (dotted letters) allows children to write over the top of each letter (a bit like join the dots).

A to Z - Look, Trace, Write

Four pages. Each cursive, lower case letter A to Z - look at it, write over the dotted version then have a try at writing it freehand.

Two Letter Joins

Five pages. Grids for practising joining pairs of letters together. Look at the example, copy write it over the dotted joins then practise writing it freehand.

Three Letter Joins

Five pages. As above but for words containing three letters.

Four Letter Joins

Five pages. Extending children beyond the two and three letter joins.

Curly Joins - j / y / f / k / g

Five pages. Grids which enable children to practise some of the 'curls and loops' necessary to maintain a continuous, cursive style.

Joining Z, X & V

Three pages. Sheets which provide children with the opportunity to practise these letters which appear less frequently in everyday words. X is the only letter which is formed by taking your pencil or pen off the page.